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Soldier Oil Field.jpg
Transform_1a.jpg
This is not a bridge _4.jpg
Shelf -3_1.jpg
Test 3.jpg
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AMERICA: State of Emergency


AMERICA: State of Emergency is a deafening auditory and visual assault on the senses, an immersive environment of pure mayhem. It consists of a series of film projections on four walls, of police cars, fire trucks and emergency service vehicle’s flashing lights and sirens on a 20 minute loop at 120 decibels.Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
© 2017-2018, Axis Mundi Design LLC

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AMERICA: State of Emergency


AMERICA: State of Emergency is a deafening auditory and visual assault on the senses, an immersive environment of pure mayhem. It consists of a series of film projections on four walls, of police cars, fire trucks and emergency service vehicle’s flashing lights and sirens on a 20 minute loop at 120 decibels.Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
© 2017-2018, Axis Mundi Design LLC

States of emergency are nothing new for the United States. The United States has been in an uninterrupted state of national emergency since 1979. There are currently 28 concurrent active national emergencies in America -- there's been at least one national emergency for nearly four decades straight.

AMERICA: State of Emergency is a deafening auditory and visual assault on the senses, an immersive environment of pure spectacle and mayhem. It consists of two perfectly fused NYPD Police Cruisers amid a series of film projections on four walls, of police cars, fire trucks and emergency service vehicle’s flashing lights and sirens on a 23 minute loop at 120 decibels. 

Concept and Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2017-2018

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Kaaba Displaced


The Kaaba Displaced, is an on-going series of architectural "thought experiments" whereby the holy Kaaba in Mecca has been relocated to a variety of different sites around the world. The new locations, the Piazza St. Pietro in Vatican City, Rome, and the Washington Monument in Washington, DC. for example, radically confronts belief systems and opens up new unexpected relationships between religion, meaning and site.

Kaaba Displaced


The Kaaba Displaced, is an on-going series of architectural "thought experiments" whereby the holy Kaaba in Mecca has been relocated to a variety of different sites around the world. The new locations, the Piazza St. Pietro in Vatican City, Rome, and the Washington Monument in Washington, DC. for example, radically confronts belief systems and opens up new unexpected relationships between religion, meaning and site.

The Kaaba Displaced is an on-going series of architectural "thought experiments" whereby the holy Kaaba in Mecca has been relocated to a variety of different sites around the world. The new locations, the Piazza St. Pietro in Vatican City, Rome, and the Washington Monument in Washington, DC. for example, radically confronts belief systems and opens up new unexpected relationships between religion, meaning and site.

Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Images: Melodie Vasseur
© 2017 Axis Mundi Design LLC.

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Omnia Vanitas


What started as a humorous riff on a podiatrist client’s plastic anatomical foot model becomes a contemporary contemplation on the theme of vanity, which has occupied artists from the Netherlandish painters of the 16th and 17th centuries right through to Marilyn Minter, whose work revels in the seamy, dirty underbelly of the fashion world. The flayed rawness of bones exposes the transience and vulnerability of human existence, which is emphasized by the fact that it is also a cheap plastic simulacrum of the real thing. 

Omnia Vanitas


What started as a humorous riff on a podiatrist client’s plastic anatomical foot model becomes a contemporary contemplation on the theme of vanity, which has occupied artists from the Netherlandish painters of the 16th and 17th centuries right through to Marilyn Minter, whose work revels in the seamy, dirty underbelly of the fashion world. The flayed rawness of bones exposes the transience and vulnerability of human existence, which is emphasized by the fact that it is also a cheap plastic simulacrum of the real thing. 

What started as a humorous riff on a podiatrist client’s plastic anatomical foot model becomes a contemporary contemplation on the theme of vanity, which has occupied artists from the Netherlandish painters of the 16th and 17th centuries right through to Marilyn Minter, whose work revels in the seamy, dirty underbelly of the fashion world. The flayed rawness of bones exposes the transience and vulnerability of human existence, which is emphasized by the fact that it is also a cheap plastic simulacrum of the real thing. Slipping this ugliness into a glamorous stiletto with rhinestone-encrusted silver straps spotlights how futile—and in this case painfully deforming—are our attempts to dress up the inescapable truth. This glitz-over-guts sculpture is as barbed as it is humorous.

Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Image: Jessica Marvin
Photography: Jeffrey Hornstein
© 2012 Axis Mundi Design LLC

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Toy Soldier Barricades


The threat to just about any place in the world where crowds tend to gather has never been greater. Barricades—of concrete, metal, razor wire, and other materials—have become commonplace presences around national monuments, cultural institutions and the epicenters of governmental and financial power. 

Toy Soldier Barricades


The threat to just about any place in the world where crowds tend to gather has never been greater. Barricades—of concrete, metal, razor wire, and other materials—have become commonplace presences around national monuments, cultural institutions and the epicenters of governmental and financial power. 

The threat to just about any place in the world where crowds tend to gather has never been greater. Barricades—of concrete, metal, razor wire, and other materials—have become commonplace presences around national monuments, cultural institutions and the epicenters of governmental and financial power. Axis Mundi proposes to literally animate the barricade concept, making it more dynamic, through the versatile use of 7 to 10 toy soldier shapes in oversized attack-formation poses that would be cast from bronze or fabricated in polished stainless steel. These forms immediately arouse nostalgia and patriotism cultivated in the childhoods of many, as well as the sense of security we associated with them when we were young. For those opposed to warlike playthings, the barrels have been left hollow to offer receptacles for flowers. They can be deployed in closed-rank phalanxes or spread out strategically depending on the level of threat. Their sculptural presence not only enlivens mundane, standard-issue barricades, but also serves to incite contemplation of war, our sense of imminent danger and the forces that we imagine represent it, our own ideas of protection and safety…the list of possible inquiries is endless.

Designed by: John Beckmann and Lane Lamerson, with Nick Messerlian, Alyssa Egnew | MoFO Projects
© 2008-2018, Axis Mundi Design LLC.

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Volkswagen Mutations


Cars form the building blocks of numerous prominent contemporary artworks, compelling because of their associations with freedom, prosperity, and status. The common characteristic of these works is that the vehicles are de-glamorized and de-aestheticized. Cars are buried as dystopian monoliths by Ant Farm, dismantled by John Chamberlain, stripped down by Walter De Maria and inflated by Edwin Wurm.

Taking inspiration from auto-designer J Mays’s experimental redesign of the Beetle that transposed its front and rear, this work extends the design process into a surrealist game. The cars have a particular affinity with Hans Bellmer’s dissected and recombined cut-and-shut bodies, where two sets of legs might converge into a single headless torso. The application of these seemingly organic mutations to industrial forms is equally unsettling, transforming the familiar into the uncanny.

In reimagining surrealist sensuality and Dadaist mischief for the contemporary moment, this work challenges the supremacy of Jeff Koons’ sterile reproductions and proposes a daring new approach to re-working found objects. In an art world that so often fetishizes the truth-value of the ugly, we are dared to be unafraid of beauty and pleasure, and reminded that art and design are just as closely conjoined as the fused elements of these sculptures. Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
© 2017-2018, Axis Mundi Design LLC

Volkswagen Mutations


Cars form the building blocks of numerous prominent contemporary artworks, compelling because of their associations with freedom, prosperity, and status. The common characteristic of these works is that the vehicles are de-glamorized and de-aestheticized. Cars are buried as dystopian monoliths by Ant Farm, dismantled by John Chamberlain, stripped down by Walter De Maria and inflated by Edwin Wurm.

Taking inspiration from auto-designer J Mays’s experimental redesign of the Beetle that transposed its front and rear, this work extends the design process into a surrealist game. The cars have a particular affinity with Hans Bellmer’s dissected and recombined cut-and-shut bodies, where two sets of legs might converge into a single headless torso. The application of these seemingly organic mutations to industrial forms is equally unsettling, transforming the familiar into the uncanny.

In reimagining surrealist sensuality and Dadaist mischief for the contemporary moment, this work challenges the supremacy of Jeff Koons’ sterile reproductions and proposes a daring new approach to re-working found objects. In an art world that so often fetishizes the truth-value of the ugly, we are dared to be unafraid of beauty and pleasure, and reminded that art and design are just as closely conjoined as the fused elements of these sculptures. Concept: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
© 2017-2018, Axis Mundi Design LLC

VW Mutations

This playfully subversive proposal takes one of the most famous design icons and transforms it into a new work that issues a challenge to some of the most important norms of contemporary art. The VW beetle has a loaded history. The Volkswagen company (meaning ‘people’s car’) was established in 1932 by the German Labor Front under Adolf Hitler.  Ferdinand Porsche’s Beetle design was chosen by Hitler as the means to fulfill his desire that every idealized German family should have a car. The Nazi-flag-red forms in the VW Mutations demand that we take a new perspective.

Cars form the building blocks of numerous prominent contemporary artworks, compelling because of their associations with freedom, prosperity, and status. The common characteristic of these works is that the vehicles are de-glamorized and de-aestheticized. Cars are buried as dystopian monoliths by Ant Farm, dismantled by John Chamberlain, stripped down by Walter De Maria and inflated by Edwin Wurm.

Taking inspiration from auto-designer J Mays’s experimental redesign of the Beetle that transposed its front and rear, this work extends the design process into a surrealist game. The cars have a particular affinity with Hans Bellmer’s dissected and recombined cut-and-shut bodies, where two sets of legs might converge into a single headless torso. The application of these seemingly organic mutations to industrial forms is equally unsettling, transforming the familiar into the uncanny.

In reimagining surrealist sensuality and Dadaist mischief for the contemporary moment, this work challenges the supremacy of Jeff Koons’ sterile reproductions and proposes a daring new approach to re-working found objects. In an art world that so often fetishizes the truth-value of the ugly, we are dared to be unafraid of beauty and pleasure, and reminded that art and design are just as closely conjoined as the fused elements of these sculptures.

Materials: Volkswagen Beetle, Type 1, 1966

Concept and Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

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This is Not a Bridge


This is Not a Bridge


This is Not a Bridge


Designed by: John Beckmann | MoFo Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

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Cloud Bookshelves


Cloud Bookshelves

Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

Cloud Bookshelves


Cloud Bookshelves

Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

Cloud Bookshelves 

Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

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Air Force One


Air Force One


Air Force One

Designed by: John Beckmann | MoFo Projects
Axis Mundi Design LLC. © 2018

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Oligarch Bullion Tiles


A metaphor for a culture of money gone wild and reckless, these gold bullion tiles provide an especially acerbic commentary on the growing wealth gap. 

Oligarch Bullion Tiles


A metaphor for a culture of money gone wild and reckless, these gold bullion tiles provide an especially acerbic commentary on the growing wealth gap. 

A metaphor for a culture of money gone wild and reckless, these gold bullion tiles provide an especially acerbic commentary on the growing wealth gap. As gold bullion implies the value behind currency, these tiles wryly point to the “one percent’s” inflated self-image and sense of worth. It’s the sort of excess an evil genius like Goldfinger would have in his bathroom. The tiles also telegraph the way in which decoration and design have become new forms of pornography for the global elite.

By making them out of porcelain and covering them with a gold metallic glaze, they instantly and wittily become democratic objects, enabling anyone to maintain the fantasy of having a powder room that looks like a miniature Fort Knox. At the same time, they also allude to desire and trophies, to the way we worship money and celebrity and secretly aspire to the hedonistic life they lead.

Concept and Design: John Beckmann | MoFO Projects
Renderings: Silvia Tosques
© 2015 Axis Mundi Design LLC

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Gumby Chair and Lamp


Gumby Chair and Lamp


Part of the goal of the designer is to bring into being forms that are completely new and modern. Such a feat is often inspired by the invention of new technologies and materials (think Frank Gehry’s titanium undulations, inconceivable even just 25 years ago). At Axis Mundi, 3D printing—which has enabled the concept of transubstantiation to move from the stuff of religious mystery and science fiction into actuality—makes possible the conceptualization of these essential, minimalist and (like Gumby himself) flexible furniture pieces. Rotational molded thermoplastic, another modern innovation, will then make the line a corporal reality.

Designed by John Beckmann, with Jake George
© 2013 Axis Mundi Design LLC

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Torus Lamp


Anarchists, punks and bikers have invaded the Chateau of the Rothschilds!

Torus Lamp


Anarchists, punks and bikers have invaded the Chateau of the Rothschilds!

In geometry, a torus is a doughnut-shaped surface generated by revolving a circle in three dimensional space around an axis that does not intersect the circle. Examples of tori include doughnuts, life preservers and inner tubes.

The Torus Lamps are produced in wall, floor and ceiling versions. They plug directly into standard duplex outlets and require no special electrical installation.

Materials: Lacquered and silver aluminum.

Designed by: John Beckmann
© 2006 Axis Mundi Design LLC

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Una Table


By experimenting with smart technological manufacturing processes (thermoforming and computerized milling) their work speaks to a new generation of end users. Their gesture is significant, their work concise. – Wallpaper Magazine

Una Table


By experimenting with smart technological manufacturing processes (thermoforming and computerized milling) their work speaks to a new generation of end users. Their gesture is significant, their work concise. – Wallpaper Magazine

“John Beckmann and David Serero have boldly united new concepts of continuity with function in creating the Una coffee table. The Una design asserts a fresh formal language with the practical and sensual properties of Corian. By experimenting with smart technological manufacturing processes (thermoforming and computerized milling) their work speaks to a new generation of end users. Their gesture is significant, their work concise”. – Wallpaper Magazine

Unique prototype coffee table sponsored by Dupont®, made of 1/4″ thick Corian, computer CNC-milled and thermoformed.
© John Beckmann and David Serero